Clinique Chiropratique du Pontiac

AIR TRAVEL IN COMFORT

Comfort isn’t usually the first word that springs to mind when we mention air travel. Backache, neck pain and fatigue are common complaints among travelers. Whether you’re a regular passenger or one of the lucky ones heading south, air travel can cause physical stress.

STRETCH YOUR LEGS
Try to get an aisle seat or a seat next to an emergency exit for maximum legroom. These seats are also less restrictive and allow you to stand up and walk more easily. Sitting in a very confined seat not only makes your back uncomfortable, it can also injure your knees and cramp your legs.Don’t put anything under the seat in front of you to stretch your legs.

KEEP MOVING
Moving around is good for circulation and helps prevent swelling of the feet and ankles. Wear loose-fitting, circulation-friendly clothing and walk down the aisle every 60-90 minutes.Wear shoes that can be removed easily and don’t cross your legs. From time to time, make circles with your feet and contract your calves to prevent blood pooling in your legs and reduce the risk of phlebitis.

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR SEAT
Most airlines fill their planes from front to back. By requesting a seat in the back rows, you increase your chances of having an empty seat next to you.If the armrest folds, you may even be able to lie down.

DRY AS THE DESERT
Air on planes generally has a humidity level of less than 20%.This dries out your skin, eyes and nose. Bring moisturizing cream and wear glasses instead of contact lenses.Drink enough fluids (water and juices) and avoid alcoholic beverages or those containing caffeine, which dehydrate even more. Take bags of herbal tea with you; those with mint or lemon-ginger help reduce motion sickness.It’s also good for you to sit over the wings or take a seat on a larger plane.

SLEEP LIKE A BABY
If you look around at other passengers, you’ll notice a lot of contorted sleeping positions. These can lead to neck and back pain, but you can avoid this. U-shaped travel pillows are ideal for keeping your neck in a neutral position and preventing your head from slumping forward or sideways during a nap. You should also consider bringing your own pillow from home, as hotel pillows are generally uncomfortable, too hard, too thick or too soft.

HOW TO PREVENT JET LAG
Jet lag often occurs when traveling, especially when crossing several time zones. The effects vary from person to person and are caused by a disruption of your internal clock versus the local time at your destination. Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is largely responsible for jet lag. This hormone is normally secreted only at night, and is essential for sleep. With jet lag, melatonin secretion is disrupted and takes a few days to return to normal, which explains the sleep problems. To reduce the effects of jet lag, adopt the local schedule as quickly as possible. Don’t go to bed when you’re tired. In any case, you’ll get less out of your trip if all you do is sleep!